O Cérebro de Broca: A Aventura da Ciência Kindle Ó

i m amazed that i was able to understand three quarters of this book with little or no help at all from any outside source there were times when i had to use the dictionary or find someone on the internet who can explain physics to a near idiot in the domain even so, i can give myself a pat on the back for this one of course, sagan writes for the masses, and this here is not real science, butlike an introduction to it, a taste even if it s a really small one for an expert, for someone i m amazed that i was able to understand three quarters of this book with little or no help at all from any outside source there were times when i had to use the dictionary or find someone on the internet who can explain physics to a near idiot in the domain even so, i can give myself a pat on the back for this one of course, sagan writes for the masses, and this here is not real science, butlike an introduction to it, a taste even if it s a really small one for an expert, for someone like me, who struggles to understand the terms and imagine the actions, it s a step forward but i am so passionate about this subject i love learning about the outer space and if physics is a part of it, then so be it there are few things out there that i consider to beworthy of attention than the mechanics of our universe and i m sure that, throughout the years, i ll be able to understand even Considering this book was written forty years ago, it s a masterpiece In it, Carl Sagan covers a range of different topics In one whole chapter, which I think is the bulk of this book, Sagan makes a critical analysis of Velikovsky s book, Worlds in Collision Sometimes the borderline between science and pseudoscience is so thin, you have to be a scientist to point it out That being said, in most cases we can apply methods and tools of skepticism and critical thinking to come to a sound decisi Considering this book was written forty years ago, it s a masterpiece In it, Carl Sagan covers a range of different topics In one whole chapter, which I think is the bulk of this book, Sagan makes a critical analysis of Velikovsky s book, Worlds in Collision Sometimes the borderline between science and pseudoscience is so thin, you have to be a scientist to point it out That being said, in most cases we can apply methods and tools of skepticism and critical thinking to come to a sound decision Sagan wisely asserts that skepticism is not denialism or cynicism It s just that you need to ask for sufficient evidence in case of extraordinary claims Miscellaneous writings by Carl Sagan I read it immediately after Cosmos was aired on Doordarshan the national TV channel of India Sagan is a great explainer reading him will automatically engender a love for science A re read after 13 years certainly was worth the effort for at least a few chapters Although a lot of information must be now updated considering this being a 1979 updated edition, this book must have been intense at that time An entire section is dedicated to debunking Paradoxers which occupiesthan a quarter of the book, especially on Immanuel Velikovsky s theories.Certain introductory chapters dealing with Why Science , Albert Einstein and about the lack of public education in A re read after 13 years certainly was worth the effort for at least a few chapters Although a lot of information must be now updated considering this being a 1979 updated edition, this book must have been intense at that time An entire section is dedicated to debunking Paradoxers which occupiesthan a quarter of the book, especially on Immanuel Velikovsky s theories.Certain introductory chapters dealing with Why Science , Albert Einstein and about the lack of public education in science were very nice to read.Other chapters that were interesting to read were related to The Solar System and the usage of Nomenclature within it on life in our Solar System based on their atmospheres a chapter based on the Surface and Atmosphere of Titan, the moon of Saturn Climates of Earth and Mars Asteroids and Meteorites Planetary Exploration Communication and Transportation Speeds In defense of Robots and AI the quest for Extraterrestrial Life Views on God and Religion, our Galaxy and the Universe and finally a chapter on the usage of psychedelic drugs and its usage to induce Perinatal Memories while relating it to understand the Origins and Nature of Religion and to Cosmology.If only Mr Sagan have had lived today, I would have loved to read a revised edition of this book now after nearly four decades of its first publication in 1974 Pre ISBNCarl Sagan, writer and scientist, returns from the frontier to tell us about how the world works In his delightfully down to earth style, he explores and explains a mind boggling future of intelligent robots, extraterrestrial life and its consquences, and other provocative, fascinating quandries of the future that we want to see today Museums have an inner world that the public never sees In one of these hideaways, Carl Sagan was permitted to view the brain of Paul Broca, a surgeon who died in 1880 As Dr Sagan looked at the cerebral remains of one of his heroes, he had this thought It was difficult to hold Broca s brain without wondering whether in some sense Broca was still in there Sagan wondered at a possible future where technology would allow us to download Broca s memories And then he wrote something that struck Museums have an inner world that the public never sees In one of these hideaways, Carl Sagan was permitted to view the brain of Paul Broca, a surgeon who died in 1880 As Dr Sagan looked at the cerebral remains of one of his heroes, he had this thought It was difficult to hold Broca s brain without wondering whether in some sense Broca was still in there Sagan wondered at a possible future where technology would allow us to download Broca s memories And then he wrote something that struck me In considering the opportunity to literally read a mind, Sagan posited, It would be the ultimate breach of privacy I was a bit awed at Sagan s willingness to troubleshoot the ethics of his own pipedream After all, what if we could tap the intelligence of brilliant men and women, now deceased It s a fascinating thought, but also a troubling one I admired Sagan for volunteering the questionable nature of his own desire for access.The above is just one of many intriguing reflections offered by Carl Sagan in Broca s Brain Reflections on the Romance of Science This book is a collection of essays, many previously published in magazines With a firm command of both science and humanity, Sagan explores a range of issues related to our existence Especially engrossing, even haunting, are his ruminations on the process of dying Sagan writes with candor about the issues facing our species He does not patronize readers with comfort for comfort s sake, but neither does he gravitate toward sensationalism Sagan s dialogue style is thoughtful and dignified, but with splashes of humor He also throws some pointed jabs at absurd notions that regrettably retain traction in modern society As our world becomes almost wholly dependent on scientific technology, works like this will be an essential frame of reference for laypersons TheI read Sagan and others, theI am convinced that being conversant in science is a matter of civic responsibility.With some technical exceptions, the content of this book is very accessible For those who have already read other works by Carl Sagan, I highly recommend it If you have not yet tried Sagan, I suggest starting with the novel Contact, or getting a hold of his groundbreaking work Cosmos The latter is available on DVD and in book form This should be a school textbook The world would be a better place. It took me a lottime than I expected, mainly because I kept checking for update information about most of the interesting topics I still love Carl Sagan s writing though. I read most of Carl Sagan s I ve been on a Sagan kick, but this was a tough read to get through The book is a little technical, but eventedious in sections, discussing in depth discoveries of the 1950s and 1960s The best parts of the book require a grasping understand of the nature of present day astronomy to compare and contrast with what Sagan thinks will occur Ever the optimist, it is a little disappointing to realize that we have not come close to the explorations that Sagan envisioned in the late 1970s Some I ve been on a Sagan kick, but this was a tough read to get through The book is a little technical, but eventedious in sections, discussing in depth discoveries of the 1950s and 1960s The best parts of the book require a grasping understand of the nature of present day astronomy to compare and contrast with what Sagan thinks will occur Ever the optimist, it is a little disappointing to realize that we have not come close to the explorations that Sagan envisioned in the late 1970s Some of his hopes have been achieved, and he would have been awed by the discoveries made by the Cassini and Huygens probes, making this book bittersweet knowing that he will never have the opportunity to comment on today s discovery A suggestion for future readers would be just to skip the vivisection of Dr Velikovsky, unless you want an example of what would happen to the likes of homeopathy or astrology if scientists truly decided to turn their attention to those false disciplines O Cérebro de Broca: A Aventura da Ciência (Biblioteca de Divulgação Científica)


About the Author: Carl Sagan

In 1934, scientist Carl Sagan was born in Brooklyn, N.Y After earning bachelor and master s degrees at Cornell, Sagan earned a double doctorate at the University of Chicago in 1960 He became professor of astronomy and space science and director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at Cornell University, and co founder of the Planetary Society A great popularizer of science, Sagan produced the PBS series, Cosmos, which was Emmy and Peabody award winning, and was watched by 500 million people in 60 countries A book of the same title came out in 1980, and was on The New York Times bestseller list for 7 weeks Sagan was author, co author or editor of 20 books, including The Dragons of Eden 1977 , which won a Pulitzer, Pale Blue Dot 1995 and The Demon Haunted World Science As a Candle in the Dark 1996 , his hardest hitting on religion With his wife, Ann Druyan, he was co producer of the popular motion picture, Contact, which featured a feminist, atheist protagonist played by Jodie Foster 1997 The film came out after Sagan s death, following a 2 year struggle with a bone marrow disease Sagan played a leading role in NASA s Mariner, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo expeditions to other planets Ann Druyan, in the epilogue to Sagan s last book, Billions and Billions Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium published posthumously in 1997 , gives a moving account of Carl s last days Contrary to the fantasies of the fundamentalists, there was no deathbed conversion, no last minute refuge taken in a comforting vision of a heaven or an afterlife For Carl, what mattered most was what was true, not merely what would make us feel better Even at this moment when anyone would be forgiven for turning away from the reality of our situation, Carl was unflinching As we looked deeply into each other s eyes, it was with a shared conviction that our wondrous life together was ending forever For his work, Dr Sagan received the NASA medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and twice for Distinguished Public Service, as well as the NASA Apollo Achievement Award Asteroid 2709 Sagan is named after him He was also awarded the John F Kennedy Astronautics Award of the American Astronautical Society, the Explorers Club 75th Anniversary Award, the Konstantin Tsiolkovsky Medal of the Soviet Cosmonauts Federation, and the Masursky Award of the American Astronomical Society, for his extraordinary contributions to the development of planetary science As a scientist trained in both astronomy and biology, Dr Sagan has made seminal contributions to the study of planetary atmospheres, planetary surfaces, the history of the Earth, and exobiology Many of the most productive planetary scientists working today are his present and former students and associates.He was also a recipient of the Public Welfare Medal, the highest award of the National Academy of Sciences.Dr Sagan was elected Chairman of the Division of Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, President of the Planetology Section of the American Geophysical Union, and Chairman of the Astronomy Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science For twelve years he was the editor in chief of Icarus, the leading professional journal devoted to planetary research He was cofounder and President of the Planetary Society, a 100,000 member organization that is the largest space interest group in the world and Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.In their posthumous award to Dr Sagan of their highest honor, the National Science Foundation declared that his research transformed planetary science his gifts to mankind were infinite D 1996.More


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