Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal Kindle ↠

Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal In this incisive and unflinching study, Randall Kennedy, author of Nigger The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word, tackles another stigma of America s racial discourse selling out He explains the origins of the concept and shows how fear of this label has haunted prominent members of the black community including, most recently, Colin Powell, Condoleezza Rice, and Barack Obama Sellout also contains a rigorously fair case study of America s quintessential racial sellout Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas In the book s final section, Kennedy recounts how he himself has dealt with accusations of being a sellout after meeting fierce criticism at Harvard upon the publication of his book, Nigger From the Trade Paperback edition Randall Kennedy of Nigger the strange career of a troublesome word has written another legal brief masquerading as a book The author discusses the concept of sellout and documents the concept very well His discussion of accusations that he is a sellout is very on point The discussion in chapter 2, however is very weak from the point of viewmodern DNA analysis The chapter 2 is entitled Who is Black Kennedy accepts American cultural racial classification, amorphous and quirky as it Randall Kennedy of Nigger the strange career of a troublesome word has written another legal brief masquerading as a book The author discusses the concept of sellout and documents the concept very well His discussion of accusations that he is a sellout is very on point The discussion in chapter 2, however is very weak from the point of viewmodern DNA analysis The chapter 2 is entitled Who is Black Kennedy accepts American cultural racial classification, amorphous and quirky as it is A further missed opportunity is Kennedy s almost complete failure to explore the world of Rap and various other criminal cabals as they relate to the concept of sellout , most famously in the manner of relations between various rappers and the police and legal system All in all, another good book that does a fairly good job of laying out the terrain of America s racial landscape I enjoyed reading this book Kennedy has a very engaging writing style that makes a rather grave subject accessible I didn t agree with all of the conclusions that Kennedy made i.e his comparison of racial outing and sexual orientation outing but Kennedy looks at the issue of selling out with a rigor and nuance that is refreshing and often convincing It made me completely rethink even my own ideas of what this term means and how it is applied For instance, I found myself feelingempat I enjoyed reading this book Kennedy has a very engaging writing style that makes a rather grave subject accessible I didn t agree with all of the conclusions that Kennedy made i.e his comparison of racial outing and sexual orientation outing but Kennedy looks at the issue of selling out with a rigor and nuance that is refreshing and often convincing It made me completely rethink even my own ideas of what this term means and how it is applied For instance, I found myself feelingempathetic to the plight of blacks who passed during and after slavery, even though I still find the idea wrong I would recommend it anyone who wants a better understanding not only of the term sellout but also the idea of racial solidarity among African Americans and how it affects our politics This is a great book that provides an insightful and even handed look at the use of the word sellout by some African Americans against other blacks.Kennedy is personally qualified, as he notes near the end of the book Besides being a professor at Harvard Law and the author of previous black sociology studies type books, he has himself been a target of the sellout monikerthan once.At the beginning, Kennedy explains that the word is used as part of efforts to maintain racial solidarity This is a great book that provides an insightful and even handed look at the use of the word sellout by some African Americans against other blacks.Kennedy is personally qualified, as he notes near the end of the book Besides being a professor at Harvard Law and the author of previous black sociology studies type books, he has himself been a target of the sellout monikerthan once.At the beginning, Kennedy explains that the word is used as part of efforts to maintain racial solidarity He then notes that other groups use similar tactics, and later in the book draws some parallels to the gay lesbian community.But, for groups in general and black in general, this raises new questions that Kennedy tackles.What are the defining points of the community, and here, specifically, the black community And, who are the guardians and gatekeepers On the former question, Kennedy says it is, without a doubt, affirmative action He then devoted an entire chapter to exploring how this rubber hit the road with Clarence Thomas.Kennedy isn t afraid to point fingers at many black guardians for merely engaging Thomas on his point of view, rather than any evidence he may have for it He links this to the larger problem of black guardians writing off black conservatives in general He makes clear that wrestling with an opposing point of view on empirical grounds does not necessarily mean agreeing with it.No 2, after affirmative action, from how I read Kennedy, he would probably say is interracial marriage.And No 3, quite relevant today with Barack Obama and Tiger Woods, is racial identity Kennedy defends an ABC reporter a year ago asking Obama about how he identified himself, in part by referencing Woods Cablinasian self designation Was really expecting something phenomenal from the title of the book, only to briskly read it and find out that the book was ordinary This book exposed a lot of history I didn t know of, but the book felt like a defense of sambos and race traitors The Clarence Thomas part was written well, but felt like a cop out for Justice Thomas He has parts of the book where makes some comparisons with other groups, which I disagree with, but drives home the point of not being quick to name call without Was really expecting something phenomenal from the title of the book, only to briskly read it and find out that the book was ordinary This book exposed a lot of history I didn t know of, but the book felt like a defense of sambos and race traitors The Clarence Thomas part was written well, but felt like a cop out for Justice Thomas He has parts of the book where makes some comparisons with other groups, which I disagree with, but drives home the point of not being quick to name call without proper examination.Another glaring omission that I caught, was that he never mentioned Thurgood Marshall being a FBI informant In his introduction he mentioned that he was an intern for Marshall during the 80 s Maybe that played a reason into him not mentioning it A decent read, but nothing to write home about

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