To Shake the Sleeping Self: A Journey from Oregon to

To Shake the Sleeping Self: A Journey from Oregon to Patagonia, and a Quest for a Life with No Regret NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER With winning candor, Jedidiah Jenkins takes us with him as he bicycles across two continents and delves deeply into his own beautiful heartCheryl Strayed, author of Wild and Tiny Beautiful ThingsOn the eve of turning thirty, terrified of being funneled into a life he didn t choose, Jedidiah Jenkins quit his dream job and spent sixteen months cycling from Oregon to Patagonia He chronicled the trip on Instagram, where his photos and reflections drew hundreds of thousands of followers, all gathered around the question What makes a life worth living In this unflinchingly honest memoir, Jed narrates his adventure the people and places he encountered on his way to the bottom of the world as well as the internal journey that started it all As he traverses cities, mountains, and inner boundaries, Jenkins grapples with the question of what it means to be an adult, his struggle to reconcile his sexual identity with his conservative Christian upbringing, and his belief in travel as a way to wake us up to life back homeA soul stirring read for the wanderer in each of us, To Shake the Sleeping Self is an unforgettable reflection on adventure, identity, and a life lived without regretPraise for To Shake the Sleeping Self Jenkins is a guy deeply connected to his personal truth and just so refreshingly presentRich Roll, author of Finding Ultra This is much than a book about a bike ride This is a deep soul deepening us Jedidiah Jenkins is a mystic disguised as a millennial Tom Shadyac, author of Life s Operating Manual Thought provoking and inspirational This uplifting memoir and travelogue will remind readers of the power of movement for the body and the soulPublishers Weekly I may return to this at some point in the future, but for the moment I won t be finishing this book Jenkins is a good writer, but the story isn t as interesting as a it should be, it s just fine. 2.5 stars this is a memoir about doing something worth writing a memoir about jed s a fine writer, but his point of view is a too benign for a travelogue good for him for taking on such an audacious adventure, for growing as a person, for working out his faith, but, if he s presenting all of that in memoir form, he should have worked on making that storyinteresting for us there were missed opportunities for humor, for rawer confession, for penetrating insights into himself and others 2.5 stars this is a memoir about doing something worth writing a memoir about jed s a fine writer, but his point of view is a too benign for a travelogue good for him for taking on such an audacious adventure, for growing as a person, for working out his faith, but, if he s presenting all of that in memoir form, he should have worked on making that storyinteresting for us there were missed opportunities for humor, for rawer confession, for penetrating insights into himself and others there s almost no exploration of the anxiety of influence born of having parents who did the very thing he set out to do travelling thousands of miles under one s own power and writing about it bizarrely, he claims his parents travels never entered his mind before his mother brought it up after he announced the trip to her he dismisses the effect his instagram celebrity might have on the presentation of his travels, but neglects any further mention of celebrity sophia bush joined him on the trip and took the cover photo given his quest for an identity and his plan to turn this whole thing into a book, I expected him to address whether he was seeking celebrity to give him the identity he was looking for it was also somewhat contradictory to recognize and throw off his life long desire to be a good boy and then confess his American chauvinism over and over in a manner that surely would get all of the NPR hosts cooing not to mention that his earnest wokeness also seems a little compensatory given the kony 2012 controversies Jed s change of faith or loss of it I not quite sure which was the least convincing part of the book for me I don t doubt that the necessities of memoir writing required some simplification, but what he offers in the book are two conversations one with Weston and one with his friends on the way to Machu Picchu that don t come close to capturing the nuances and complexities of changes seen in other spiritual autobiographies I really wanted to love this book I followed his travels on Instagram I enjoyed his interviews I love a good travelogue I enjoyed the first half of the book, but by the second half I was ready for it to be done Good for him for taking this journey, but he s just not that interesting All of the religious guilt and baggage was irritating I just wanted him to let go of it and have some wild sex, and be free His privilege was so apparent and he didn t seem to recognize it I appreciated his I really wanted to love this book I followed his travels on Instagram I enjoyed his interviews I love a good travelogue I enjoyed the first half of the book, but by the second half I was ready for it to be done Good for him for taking this journey, but he s just not that interesting All of the religious guilt and baggage was irritating I just wanted him to let go of it and have some wild sex, and be free His privilege was so apparent and he didn t seem to recognize it I appreciated his honesty, but I found myself wanting to shake him and tell him to give his moneyfreely, and let go of his judgement and guilt I found his traveling companion so muchinteresting than Jed, and I can t say that I blame him for not returning I would give it 3 stars overall, but it was a disappointment Don t want to be completely negative because some people might really like this, but it just wasn t for me.I did enjoy the scenery descriptions, Jed s travel buddy Wes was a very interesting character as well as the random people they met along the way That said, Jed is a man who decides on a whim to bike from Oregon to Patagonia in South America He s lived his life up to 30 abiding by the religion and belief system he was raised into, living on the safe side never taking chances always sc Don t want to be completely negative because some people might really like this, but it just wasn t for me.I did enjoy the scenery descriptions, Jed s travel buddy Wes was a very interesting character as well as the random people they met along the way That said, Jed is a man who decides on a whim to bike from Oregon to Patagonia in South America He s lived his life up to 30 abiding by the religion and belief system he was raised into, living on the safe side never taking chances always scared to get into trouble.This book is called To Shake the Sleeping Self, and the main thing that bothers me about it is I don t think he did that at all He s still asleep at the end in many ways So many mind opening experiences he turned down because of his preconceived beliefs and ideas It s awesome that he feels strongly about them but unfortunately it doesn t make for an exciting story Nothing feels resolved by the end, his mother calls him disgusting for being gay and then he sweeps it alway and never confronts the issue, acting like their relationship is sunshine and rainbows if only he doesn t bring up a major part of himself Had a lot of potential but I just did not feel like he truly let himself explore and try new experiences He went home 3 months into the trip and was constantly wanting friends to come see him It never felt like he completely just immersed himself in the different cultures, he seemed pretty wrapped up in what people were doing back home and his social media accounts

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