[Reading] ➸ A Mountain of Crumbs By Elena Gorokhova – Reliableradio.co.uk

A Mountain of Crumbs Elena Gorokhova Grows Up In 1960 S Leningrad Where She Discovers That Beauty And Passion Can Be Found In Unexpected Places In Soviet Russia.A Mountain Of Crumbs Is The Moving Story Of A Young Soviet Girl S Discovery Of The Hidden Truths Of Adulthood And Her Country S Profound Political Deception Elena, Born With A Desire To Explore The World Beyond Her Borders, Finds Her Passion In The Complexity Of The English Language But In The Soviet Union Of The 1960s, Such A Passion Verges On The Subversive Elena S Home Is No Longer The Majestic Russia Of Literature Or The Tsars Instead, It Is A Nation Humiliated By Its First Faltering Steps After World War II, Putting Up Appearances For The Sake Of Its Regime And Fighting To Retain Its Pride In This Deeply Affecting Memoir, Elena Re Creates The World That Both Oppressed And Inspired Her She Recounts Stories Passed Down To Her About The Horrors Of The Bolshevik Revolution And Probes The Daily Deprivations And Small Joys Of Her Family S Bunkerlike Existence Through Elena S Captivating Voice, We Learn Not Only The Personal Story Of Russia In The Second Half Of The Twentieth Century, But Also The Story Of One Rebellious Citizen Whose Love Of A Foreign Language Finally Transports Her To A New World This Moving Memoir Made Me Cry The New York Times


About the Author: Elena Gorokhova

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Mountain of Crumbs book, this is one of the most wanted Elena Gorokhova author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “A Mountain of Crumbs

  1. says:

    This story, written by a non native English speaker, thoroughly captivated me Clearly it is a memoir, without the usual full details found in an autobiography Elena Gorokhova has conveyed tangibly and charmingly how her life was growing up in the USSR during the 50 s and 60 s until her immigration to America The states of hopelessness, oppression and deception, which were


  2. says:

    3.5 stars The first half of this book I would rate 5 stars, I really enjoyed Elena s early childhood memories and the stories of her mother and grandmother, their daily rituals, meals and philosophies I loved the details of their food, the school memories and Elena s perception of those around her.For me, half way through the book everything changed I didn t find anything inter.


  3. says:

    NO SPOILERSMy final opinion is that this was a deeply honest and humorous autibiograohy It extremely well depicts life behind the Iron Curtain during the 70s and 80s The crooked truth, the need to hide your true thoughts, the need to pretend were fundamental to life in Russia at this time I had a hard time choosing 4 or 5 stars, but have chosen 4 While I sat there rading, I most often


  4. says:

    Gorokhova s memoir of growing up in Soviet Russia.Initially, I really liked this book I particularly enjoyed Gorokhova s stories about her mother s younger days and about her own childhood in Leningrad As the author plunged on into her adulthood, however, I started to grow bored, and eventually found myself skimming a bit toward the end.I m still a bit confused as to why Gorokhova was so desp


  5. says:

    There are some insightful moments, some that could be Everywoman s story and some that can only be Sovietwoman s I like the Russian sayings that the older generation used like If you knew where you d fall, you d put down some straw Or When things are good, don t search for better The concept ofvranyo keeps coming up, the idea of pretending things are straight even when you know they re crooked and e


  6. says:

    I never thought I d read a memoir on growing up and coming of age in Leningrad in 1960s 70s written in English as opposed to in Russian All the same, I loved Gorokhova s wonderful prose with humorous overtones and very clever use of Russian words and transliterations I had a feeling that the author was describing some of my school and childhood experiences, even though I am 15 years younger than she is A t


  7. says:

    Couldn t put this down, and I don t think it s because I m Russian The beauty of language captivated me It reads like a novel, and there is so much heart and warmth and at the same time starkness in this book, that it will stay with you for a long time I know it will stay with me.


  8. says:

    I didn t like this book as much as I thought I would The book is beautifully written, and there are a few charming stories from Lena s childhood, but overall, it was a dull and sometimes frustrating read The book is pretty slow paced, and there was not really anything overly exciting that happened in Lena s life There was the time her father passed away, but she didn t write much about it It was written almost as a ...


  9. says:

    Published by Star Tribune, review written by Laurie Hertzel Even if Elena Gorokhova weren t such a gorgeous writer, her memoir, A Mountain of Crumbs, would be a terrific read Gorokhova grew up in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and 70s, where her life was unremarkable in many ways Her mother was a doctor, h...


  10. says:

    I picked up A Mountain of Crumbs by Elena Gorokhova by chance while browsing in store at Indigo Not often does one find contemporary books about Russia, written by a Russian and interestingly enough originally written in English The story also sounded compelling a woman growing up during the Soviet times in what used to be Leningrad and is now St Petersburg, told as she reconciled the country s past and her own future.The other reaso


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